UCLA Again...

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Offline skyways

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UCLA Again...

  • on: September 07, 2010, 12:38:40 PM
Any one mention these article before?

Mod, please re-direct me if that was on forum before.
http://www.today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/sta ... 95128.aspx

Jul 01, 2009 By Alison Hewitt
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory

When Michael Jackson's ambulance arrived at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center on Thursday, June 25, the star was soon followed by hordes of paparazzi, TV reporters, fans and more. The crowd only grew from there.


News crews swarmed outside the medical center to report on Jackson's death. Photo by Seth Odell.
In what many UCLA staff described as the biggest surge of media on campus in memory, even bigger than the 1984 Olympics, dozens of Bruins from departments all over campus teamed up to respond to the unprecedented crowds. Their tasks ranged from keeping aggressive paparazzi from sneaking into the emergency room, to crowd and traffic control, to arranging a press conference with the Jackson family – not to mention medical care for Jackson.

"Staff at the UCLA Medical Center really pulled together during this unprecedented event, from the doctors and nurses to the security, the media representatives and more," said Amir Dan Rubin, the Chief Operating Officer of the hospital. "As hundreds of mourners and press appeared on our doorstep, our team successfully responded to the unexpected surge of interest in one patient without letting it ever interfere with our ability to provide exceptional care for each and every one of our other patients."

When Jackson's ambulance arrived early Thursday afternoon, it was clear that the hospital needed to react quickly before the swelling crowd got out of control. A call went out to UCLA's police department moments after Jackson's ambulance arrived, said UCPD Captain John Adams.


Hundreds of fans, mourners and media massed outside UCLA's medical center when news broke that Michael Jackson was inside. Photo by Seth Odell.
"We were on scene one minute later," Adams said. Their job was all the trickier because the throngs began arriving even faster than the police did. "We secured the perimeter to make sure that the ER was still accessible to people who needed to be treated, while keeping the paparazzi out. We were cognizant that there could be people who were faking an injury or illness just to get in and snap pictures. We also worked closely with the Jackson family to help them come in safely."

All incoming patients and patients' visitors were screened. Charles Young Drive South was closed to all but ambulance traffic, and police set up barricades of yellow tape, reinforced with UC police, hospital security, officers from the Los Angeles Police Department and elsewhere. Adams estimated there were up to 1,500 gawkers, mourners and media around the hospital.

"We contacted the LAPD for their assistance because we knew this was going to be a large-scale event," Adams said. "We used their assistance to create safe passage for patients and to keep the looky-loos back."


News crews took over the lawns at the medical center to report on Jackson's death. Photo by Seth Odell.
The hospital stopped one reporter who was caught sneaking in via an underground elevator from a parking garage directly to the emergency room, and Adams encountered another. "I'm not sure whether anyone faked an injury, but we did have one individual come in for treatment who was a paparazzi," Adams added. "We made sure they didn't have access to a secure area."

The hospital's media relations representatives worked with Jackson's family to arrange an announcement to the press in a downstairs auditorium. There were some anxious moments as crowds of journalists and fans gathered in front of the medical center's main entrance waiting to be let in. More than a dozen hospital and campus media reps joined officers in guiding reporters downstairs five at a time, checking media credentials at the door and turning away fans. Reporters and bulky video cameras soon filled the space, and even though the room seats nearly 200, not all the media could fit.

"We all did our best to accommodate an unprecedented volume of reporters on campus due to the extraordinary level of interest in Michael Jackson's death," said Phil Hampton, assistant director of UCLA's Office of Media Relations.


"King of Pop is dead at 50," read a newspaper at an impromptu memorial to Michael Jackson the day after his death. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
Jackson's brother Jermaine confirmed the news already being reported. "The legendary King of Pop, Michael Jackson, passed away on Thursday, June 25, 2009, at 2:26 p.m. It is believed he suffered cardiac arrest in his home," he said. "A team of [UCLA] doctors, including emergency physicians and cardiologists, attempted to resuscitate him for a period of more than one hour but were unsuccessful."

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a helicopter to lift Jackson's body from the hospital to the coroner's office, and the California Highway Patrol was on hand to create a traffic break and provide an escort in case the helicopter was unavailable. On campus, the UCLA Fire Department stepped in to make sure a candlelight vigil didn't light foliage ablaze. Media relations representatives took calls and answered questions day and night.

UCLA's Parking Services juggled the hundreds of bumper-to-bumper TV trucks from around the world seeking curbside access to the hospital, helping them park close enough to transmit live shots from their roving cameras.


Some news vans ignored UCLA's parking officers and parked on the grass, where their tires tore into the lawn. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
"We provided public parking [at the regular rate] in structure 8, and we allowed the TV trucks to park in the north and southbound lanes of Westwood, keeping the middle open for traffic," said Steve Rand, manager of traffic, events and adjudication for Parking Services. "Although we have never had this many media in my memory – that's 30 years on campus – we do have an emergency plan that calls for this very thing."

Two tow trucks circled the area, and public cars that parked in media slots were ticketed. E-mails were sent to UCLA staff parked in structures 6, 8 and 9, recommending alternative routes out of campus. Preventing pedestrians from crossing or blocking Westwood Plaza took as much attention as traffic control, Rand said.

"Trying to keep people out of traffic lanes was a big part of our job," he said. "There really isn't a lot of room in front of the hospital for people to gather."


A sequined glove, a tribute to Jackson's jewel-encrusted trademark, lay among the bouquets, posters and votive candles at an impromptu memorial to Jackson outside the hospital. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
Slowly, the press and the crowds began to let up. Many TV news crews left after a final 11 p.m. live shot, and although the satellite trucks returned as early as 2 a.m. to begin shooting for morning news shows, the street was almost bare of news vehicles by late morning. Campus and hospital media representatives continued to receive calls for days, and professors from across campus were called on for their expertise to comment on aspects of Jackson's life and legacy.

But the same day that the crowds arrived on campus, they also dissipated. Facilities Management sent clean-up crews to collect the debris left behind by the hundreds of onlookers, and an impromptu memorial to Jackson was contained within a red tape barrier. The morning after Jackson's death, the hundreds had dwindled to a half-dozen, and UCLA staff from campus police, fire, transportation, the hospital, media relations, and other units began to return to more routine duties.

"We worked really well with the hospital and media relations and parking and the LAPD and everyone else," said Adams. "I'm pretty proud of how all the different units on campus were able to work together to create that controlled chaos."

"It took a true team effort on the part of the hospital and the campus community to effectively manage a fluidly unfolding and fast-paced situation," said Roxanne Yamaguchi Moster, director of UCLA's Health Sciences Media Relations. "We are grateful for all of the support we received."

Credit goes to Facebook  beLIEve that MJ is ALIVE  wall page again, Thanx :) http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2 ... /group.php?
gid=224378786277&v=wall
Jacky-Jean Jackson FULL UCLA ARTICLE:
http://www.today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/sta ... 95128.aspx
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory / UCLA Today
http://www.today.ucla.edu
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory / UCLA Today
9 hours ago
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline StrangerInCalifornia

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 07, 2010, 05:34:18 PM
I believe this is the most UCLA has ever said about this and they kind of make it seem like an event or something. There is something very strange about this article, but I cant quite put my finger on it.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline suspicious mind

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 07, 2010, 07:24:20 PM
just seems to describe how they handled the media event  of the whole thing(that i can see) no mention of what actually transspired with the medical emergancy.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
"I am sending you out like sheep among wolves. Therefore be shrewd as serpents and as innocent as doves."  




Why not just tell people I'm an alien from Mars? Tell them I eat live chickens and do a voodoo dance at midnight. They'll believe anything you say, because you're a reporter. But if I, Michael Jackson, were to say, "I'm an alien from Mars and I eat live chickens and do a voodoo dance at midnight," people would say, "Oh, man, that Michael Jackson is nuts. He's cracked up. You can't believe a single word that comes out of his mouth."

Offline all4loveandbelieve

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 07, 2010, 09:20:40 PM
How come this came out now after 13 months later?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »


I'm happy to be alive, I'm happy to be who I am.
Michael Jackson

Offline MJs Tinkerbell

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 07, 2010, 09:57:50 PM
Where are all the pictures??   :?
You would think with all the people and especially paps, there would be more pics.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline truthprevails

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 08, 2010, 05:13:40 AM
Um, the article is dated July 1, 2009, but I've never seen it.  I noticed that no medical staff is quoted...

The only people quoted are:
Amir Dan Rubin = Chief Operating Officer (COO) of UCLA
John Adams = UCPD Captain
Phil Hampton = Assistant Director of UCLA's Office of Media Relations
Steve Rand = Manager of traffic, events and adjudication for Parking Services
Roxanne Yamaguchi Moster = Director of UCLA's Health Sciences Media Relations
Jermaine (and his announcement)  

Photographers:
Seth Odell = Media Relations Assistant, UCLA
Alison Hewitt = a writer for UCLA Today (according to the Internet)

Here's the UCLA Office of Media Relations:
http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/me ... tacts.aspx

Not sure if any of the above is significant, but I find it a bit odd that the article is solely about the great challenge faced by the UCLA staff, and how they rose to the occasion and deserved a pat on the shoulder, and Michael's death (!) is treated in a very neutral/detached way, as if it were Lindsay Lohan getting drunk or something.  Michael is supposed to have died that day!!  And Adams said something strange: "I'm pretty proud of how all the different units on campus were able to work together to create that controlled chaos."  Create the chaos?  Michael (supposedly) died and all he can think of is that he's proud?
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Offline chloead505

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 08, 2010, 05:55:13 AM
The article totally sounds like it's been a sensational and exciting show that they were proud to be a part of. If we didn't think this was  a hoax...sounds a bit sick.

But what's more interesting: there has NEVER been an interview, quote, photo, anything! with or from the medical staff. If everyone was there, how come there is NO picture of anything, anyone...???
Also the fact that a NURSE was supposed to tell the family Mike is dead is total nonsense!!! Nurses cannot do that, never. Only doctors can do that. And do we know about any doctor??

Dodgy dodgy dodgy, that's all it is. And yes, creating organized chaos sounds very "hoaxy"  :lol:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline MFFreedom

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 13, 2010, 10:10:07 AM
Quote from: "skyways"
Any one mention these article before?

Mod, please re-direct me if that was on forum before.
http://www.today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/sta ... 95128.aspx

Jul 01, 2009 By Alison Hewitt
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory

When Michael Jackson's ambulance arrived at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center on Thursday, June 25, the star was soon followed by hordes of paparazzi, TV reporters, fans and more. The crowd only grew from there.


News crews swarmed outside the medical center to report on Jackson's death. Photo by Seth Odell.
In what many UCLA staff described as the biggest surge of media on campus in memory, even bigger than the 1984 Olympics, dozens of Bruins from departments all over campus teamed up to respond to the unprecedented crowds. Their tasks ranged from keeping aggressive paparazzi from sneaking into the emergency room, to crowd and traffic control, to arranging a press conference with the Jackson family – not to mention medical care for Jackson.

"Staff at the UCLA Medical Center really pulled together during this unprecedented event, from the doctors and nurses to the security, the media representatives and more," said Amir Dan Rubin, the Chief Operating Officer of the hospital. "As hundreds of mourners and press appeared on our doorstep, our team successfully responded to the unexpected surge of interest in one patient without letting it ever interfere with our ability to provide exceptional care for each and every one of our other patients."

When Jackson's ambulance arrived early Thursday afternoon, it was clear that the hospital needed to react quickly before the swelling crowd got out of control. A call went out to UCLA's police department moments after Jackson's ambulance arrived, said UCPD Captain John Adams.


Hundreds of fans, mourners and media massed outside UCLA's medical center when news broke that Michael Jackson was inside. Photo by Seth Odell.
"We were on scene one minute later," Adams said. Their job was all the trickier because the throngs began arriving even faster than the police did. "We secured the perimeter to make sure that the ER was still accessible to people who needed to be treated, while keeping the paparazzi out. We were cognizant that there could be people who were faking an injury or illness just to get in and snap pictures. We also worked closely with the Jackson family to help them come in safely."

All incoming patients and patients' visitors were screened. Charles Young Drive South was closed to all but ambulance traffic, and police set up barricades of yellow tape, reinforced with UC police, hospital security, officers from the Los Angeles Police Department and elsewhere. Adams estimated there were up to 1,500 gawkers, mourners and media around the hospital.

"We contacted the LAPD for their assistance because we knew this was going to be a large-scale event," Adams said. "We used their assistance to create safe passage for patients and to keep the looky-loos back."


News crews took over the lawns at the medical center to report on Jackson's death. Photo by Seth Odell.
The hospital stopped one reporter who was caught sneaking in via an underground elevator from a parking garage directly to the emergency room, and Adams encountered another. "I'm not sure whether anyone faked an injury, but we did have one individual come in for treatment who was a paparazzi," Adams added. "We made sure they didn't have access to a secure area."

The hospital's media relations representatives worked with Jackson's family to arrange an announcement to the press in a downstairs auditorium. There were some anxious moments as crowds of journalists and fans gathered in front of the medical center's main entrance waiting to be let in. More than a dozen hospital and campus media reps joined officers in guiding reporters downstairs five at a time, checking media credentials at the door and turning away fans. Reporters and bulky video cameras soon filled the space, and even though the room seats nearly 200, not all the media could fit.

"We all did our best to accommodate an unprecedented volume of reporters on campus due to the extraordinary level of interest in Michael Jackson's death," said Phil Hampton, assistant director of UCLA's Office of Media Relations.


"King of Pop is dead at 50," read a newspaper at an impromptu memorial to Michael Jackson the day after his death. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
Jackson's brother Jermaine confirmed the news already being reported. "The legendary King of Pop, Michael Jackson, passed away on Thursday, June 25, 2009, at 2:26 p.m. It is believed he suffered cardiac arrest in his home," he said. "A team of [UCLA] doctors, including emergency physicians and cardiologists, attempted to resuscitate him for a period of more than one hour but were unsuccessful."

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a helicopter to lift Jackson's body from the hospital to the coroner's office, and the California Highway Patrol was on hand to create a traffic break and provide an escort in case the helicopter was unavailable. On campus, the UCLA Fire Department stepped in to make sure a candlelight vigil didn't light foliage ablaze. Media relations representatives took calls and answered questions day and night.

UCLA's Parking Services juggled the hundreds of bumper-to-bumper TV trucks from around the world seeking curbside access to the hospital, helping them park close enough to transmit live shots from their roving cameras.


Some news vans ignored UCLA's parking officers and parked on the grass, where their tires tore into the lawn. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
"We provided public parking [at the regular rate] in structure 8, and we allowed the TV trucks to park in the north and southbound lanes of Westwood, keeping the middle open for traffic," said Steve Rand, manager of traffic, events and adjudication for Parking Services. "Although we have never had this many media in my memory – that's 30 years on campus – we do have an emergency plan that calls for this very thing."

Two tow trucks circled the area, and public cars that parked in media slots were ticketed. E-mails were sent to UCLA staff parked in structures 6, 8 and 9, recommending alternative routes out of campus. Preventing pedestrians from crossing or blocking Westwood Plaza took as much attention as traffic control, Rand said.

"Trying to keep people out of traffic lanes was a big part of our job," he said. "There really isn't a lot of room in front of the hospital for people to gather."


A sequined glove, a tribute to Jackson's jewel-encrusted trademark, lay among the bouquets, posters and votive candles at an impromptu memorial to Jackson outside the hospital. Photo by Alison Hewitt.
Slowly, the press and the crowds began to let up. Many TV news crews left after a final 11 p.m. live shot, and although the satellite trucks returned as early as 2 a.m. to begin shooting for morning news shows, the street was almost bare of news vehicles by late morning. Campus and hospital media representatives continued to receive calls for days, and professors from across campus were called on for their expertise to comment on aspects of Jackson's life and legacy.

But the same day that the crowds arrived on campus, they also dissipated. Facilities Management sent clean-up crews to collect the debris left behind by the hundreds of onlookers, and an impromptu memorial to Jackson was contained within a red tape barrier. The morning after Jackson's death, the hundreds had dwindled to a half-dozen, and UCLA staff from campus police, fire, transportation, the hospital, media relations, and other units began to return to more routine duties.

"We worked really well with the hospital and media relations and parking and the LAPD and everyone else," said Adams. "I'm pretty proud of how all the different units on campus were able to work together to create that controlled chaos."

"It took a true team effort on the part of the hospital and the campus community to effectively manage a fluidly unfolding and fast-paced situation," said Roxanne Yamaguchi Moster, director of UCLA's Health Sciences Media Relations. "We are grateful for all of the support we received."

Credit goes to Facebook  beLIEve that MJ is ALIVE  wall page again, Thanx :) http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2 ... /group.php?
gid=224378786277&v=wall
Jacky-Jean Jackson FULL UCLA ARTICLE:
http://www.today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/sta ... 95128.aspx
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory / UCLA Today
http://www.today.ucla.edu
Staff leap into action as Jackson creates campus' biggest media surge in memory / UCLA Today
9 hours ago


Wow! What a quote!  :lol:  :shock: create a controlled chaos! Should rather be a "I'm pretty proud of how all the different units on campus were able to work together to keep this chaos under control" if it was NOT a hoax. What a quote, I just can say that ...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
"... and the truth shall set you free" David Icke

Offline dominque

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Re: UCLA Again...

  • on: September 14, 2010, 12:30:01 PM
How is that so when they did not show coverage of all the people untill later.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »